Technology and Innovation in Japan: Policy and Management for the Twenty-First Century

By Martin Hemmert; Christian Oberländer | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

After the Second World War, Japan’s economy underwent a period of rapid economic growth and has now drawn equal with other industrialized countries in terms of productivity. A crucial driving force behind this growth process was technological progress: Japan managed to close the technological gap.

In the first decades after the war, technology transfer from the US and Western Europe played a major role in advancing Japan’s technological level. During this period, the Japanese system of science and technology was oriented towards the quick distribution and utilization of technological know-how. However, since the beginning of the 1980s, Japan has advanced to a position of leadership in numerous fields of technology. In order to preserve her long-term international competitiveness, the strengthening of Japan’s domestic system of technology generation has become a crucial task.

In the 1990s, the need for structural change in the technology and innovation system is generally acknowledged in Japan. There is a continuous dis-course, however, about what strategies and measures should be actually taken to facilitate the transformation process. From a Western perspective, the course of this discussion and the strategies and policies resulting from it are important also. As Japan is now a major economic and technological power, the innovation system of this country has become a significant factor for international competition and global economic development. Moreover, since technological interdependence on the international level is rapidly progressing, mutual understanding of the institutional setting in other countries is of growing importance as a prerequisite for smooth and successful international cooperation in the field of science and technology.

In June and July 1996, a series of international workshops were held at the German Institute for Japanese Studies in Tokyo about the recent structural change in Japan’s system of technology and innovation. Japanese and Western experts discussed in detail the recent state of the ongoing debate in Japan. The Japanese innovation system was analyzed on three levels: (1) institutional structure; (2) main functions of technology policy, technology

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technology and Innovation in Japan: Policy and Management for the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.