Technology and Innovation in Japan: Policy and Management for the Twenty-First Century

By Martin Hemmert; Christian Oberländer | Go to book overview

11

R&D CONSORTIA IN THE 1990s

National competitiveness and international cooperation in the case of semiconductors

Koki Inoue1

Introduction

Japan is adapting to the new information age of the post-cold war era by not only strengthening its economy, but also actively building up new international relations. This is also true in the area of Science and Technology (S&T) policy. The S&T Basic Law (1995) and the Cabinet’s S&T Basic Plan (1996), both novelties enacted half a century after the surrender of the Japanese Empire at the end of the Second World War, are a kind of Japanese Manifesto for such change. Emanating from a feeling of crisis among the Japanese, both the Law and the Plan aim at heightening Japan’s national competitiveness by strengthening its domestic R&D base and thereby increasing Japan’s contribution to the world. There are certain S&T policy areas such as the liberalization of government regulations to improve the environment of research and development (R&D) activities in Japan which would lead to both increased Japanese competitiveness and contributions to world S&T efforts. However, in the area of governmental R&D project policy, there seems to be a ‘salad bowl’ consisting of certain projects mainly for competitiveness and certain projects for international contribution. Nonetheless, under the expected budget constraints of the twenty-first century, there is pressure to establish a new type of ‘dual purpose’ R&D project policy where both purposes are sought in a single project.

This paper examines the two characteristics appearing in both the S&T Law and the Plan: governmental S&T policies for ‘national competitiveness’ and for ‘international (global) contributions.’ Herein I present the case of the semiconductor industry which is one of the most critical areas of S&T policy.

Resource needs for semiconductor R&D tend to surpass individual companies’ resources even for manufacturing technology, and at the same time, accessibility and uncertainty of manufacturing technology have increased

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technology and Innovation in Japan: Policy and Management for the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.