The Political Economy of Transition: Coming to Grips with History and Methodology

By Jozef M.Van Brabant | Go to book overview

Part II


COMPONENTS OF THE TRANSFORMATION AGENDA

The following chapters examine in detail the five components with their five qualifiers of the coherent strategy for economic transformation proposed in Chapter 3. Two remarks are necessary to justify the choice of six chapters. From among the “institutions of the market” I single out the state as a topic for special attention for two reasons. One is that the economic role of the state in the transition, as argued in Chapter 9, is by necessity sui generis. Also, the proper role of the state in more general policy making, such as in the posttransition period, is almost always far more encompassing and complex than most economists, particularly the champions of liberalism, have been willing to concede. While it is true that professional economists cannot foreclose political choice with its various responsibilities, they should be in a position to proffer professionally sound options, with their various advantages and drawbacks spelled out under alternative scenarios, for policy makers to choose from. Also, as justified in Chapter 3, I consider the establishment and maintenance of a social safety net to constitute an integral part of good governance during the transformation, not just something that may be politically desirable to avert sociopolitical flak being projected onto the application of “professionally smooth” strategies. Policy making during the transition is by necessity rather messy. How else could one engineer societal transformations in the real world?

It is admittedly a bit awkward to treat the various components of a coherent transformation agenda in separate chapters. For one thing, many of the topics included in one chapter are intricately interrelated with others discussed elsewhere. For example, stabilization in practice cannot be pursued without liberalization. But confounding the two is not the most useful approach. I decided to treat them separately, with appropriate cross references, even at the risk of some repetition and redundancy. I can conceive of no other way in which the qualifiers on sequencing, sectoralism, intensity, comprehensiveness, and speed can be handled systematically in anything like a comprehensive overview.

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of Transition: Coming to Grips with History and Methodology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 560

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.