Reading Cultures: The Construction of Readers in the Twentieth Century

By Molly Abel Travis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I want to express my gratitude to a number of friends and colleagues who have influenced and read this manuscript over the course of its evolution. Thanks to Krista Ratcliffe, Jeanne Colleran, Jamie Barlowe, Cheryl Glenn, Rebecca Rickly, and Merry Pawlowski for years of generous friendship and intellectual conversation. I thank those colleagues in the English department at Tulane who have provided community and intellectual intensity, including Amy Koritz, Rebecca Mark, Theresa Toulouse, Cynthia Lowenthal, and Supriya Nair. I was fortunate to participate in two splendid NEH seminars with Paula Treichler and Anthony Appiah that directly influenced the subject matter of this book. I benefited from Richard Lanham's considerable knowledge of and expertise in hypertextuality and digital literacy and from his insightful comments on chapters of this text. I am forever grateful to James Phelan for his searching questions and carefully considered commentary on my work, beginning in graduate school and continuing through this project. To my colleague Molly Rothenberg goes my deepest gratitude for her meticulous reading and valuable criticism -- and for the patience she displayed in responding to the early, rough draft of this manuscript. Her generosity and intelligence have immeasurably improved this book.

Tracey Sobol has been the most wonderful of editors: unendingly supportive, wise, candid, and an incisive reader. Also, I extend my appreciation to Carol Burns for her good advice and direction in shepherding this project through its final stages.

A grant from the Committee on Research at Tulane University (summer 1990) enabled me to begin this project.

I dedicate this book to my husband, Paul, and my sons, Austen and Joshua, who keep me honest and sane by constantly returning me to what is important in life.

Two sections of this book have been previously published and are reprinted with the permission of the publishers. Chapter 3 is based on work that was first published in Narrative, Vol. 2, No. 3 ( October 1994). Copyright 1994 Ohio State University Press. All rights reserved. An earlier version of chapter 4 originally appeared in Mosaic, Volume 29, Number 4.

-vii-

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