we depict and refer to women and men. Numerous research studies have documented the nature and prevalence of stereotypical images in all of these areas, so that there seems no doubt that our major cultural forms embody assumptions about the sexes that many would wish to challenge. Nevertheless, the questions of how influential such representations are in how we behave toward each other and how we may understand the processes through which this influence takes place are not so easily answered. While social learning theory has been popular as a way of understanding the influence of media images, its usefulness is perhaps limited. We need to understand how people engage with media messages in the way that they do (and also why they don’t) and some writers have drawn on psychoanalytic theory to do this. The question of influence takes a rather different turn when we consider language, with writers from a variety of backgrounds arguing that language (and the representations contained within it) heavily influences the way we think and perhaps even constitutes it. At the very least, the debate seems to have moved away from the older but unfruitful issue of whether people should be seen as either ‘sponges’ soaking up the messages embedded in representations and language or as ‘users’ impervious to them.


Further reading

c
Cameron, D. (1992) Feminism and Linguistic Theory (second edition), Basingstoke: Macmillan. A comprehensive and thorough analysis of gendered language.

d
Durkin, K. (1985) Television, Sex Roles and Children: A Developmental Social Psychological Account, Milton Keynes: Open University Press. A classic book in the field, balancing psychological and sociological theory and research.
Dworkin, A. (1981) Pornography: Men Possessing Women, London: The Women’s Press. Dworkin puts forward her radical feminist case against pornography.

w
Weedon, C. (1987) Feminist Practice and Poststructuralist Theory, Oxford: Blackwell. An accessible account of the construction of gender through language and discourse.

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender and Social Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Chapter 1 - Key Issues and Perspectives 1
  • Further Reading 23
  • Chapter 2 - Gender Differences in Personality 25
  • Chapter 3 - Education 51
  • Chapter 4 - Work and Family 75
  • Further Reading 98
  • Chapter 5 - Representations and Language 99
  • Further Reading 122
  • Chapter 6 - Gender and Psychological Research 123
  • Further Reading 144
  • Glossary 145
  • References 149
  • Index 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.