2

Without end, no, State of drawingness, no, rather: The Executioner’s taking off

Translated by Catherine A.F. MacGillivray

‘I want the beforehand of a book.’ I just wrote this sentence, but before this sentence, I wrote a hundred others, which I’ve suppressed, because the moment for cutting short had arrived. It’s not me, it’s necessity which has cut the text we were on the way to writing. Because the text and I, we would continue on our way.

‘I’ve learned to tear up nothing of what I write,’ Clarice Inspector tells me. But then comes the time for separation. The time for publication. I would like so much this unknown untorn page. Everything we read: remains.

I want the forest before the book, the abundance of leaves before the pages, I love the creation as much as the created, no, more. I love the Kafka of the Journals, the executioner-victim, I love the process a thousand times more than the Trial process (no, a hundred times more). I want the tornados in the atelier.

And what I love best are Dostoevsky’s notebooks, the crazy and tumul-tuous forge, where Love and Hate embrace, rolling around on the ground in convulsions which thwart all calculation and all hope: no one knows who will be born of this possessed belly, who will win, who will survive.

I want the world of pulses, before destiny, I want the prenatal and anonymous night. I want (the arrival) to see arriving.

Acts of birth, potency, and impotency mingled are what I’m passionate about. The to-be-in-the-process of writing or drawing. (Mais pourquoi avons-nousperdu le gérondif en français P Le vrai temps de ce texts est le gérondif.)

There is no end to writing or drawing. Being born doesn’t end. Drawing is a being born. Drawing is born.

‘Sans Arrêt, non, Etat de Dessination, non, plutôt: Le Décollage du Bourreau’ was first published in Repentirs (Réunion des musées nationaux, 1991): 55-64; this translation first appeared in New Literary History 24, 1, 1993 (Winter): 90-103.

-20-

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