Regionalization and Globalization in the Modern World Economy: Perspectives on the Third World and Transitional Economies

By Alex E. Fernández Jilberto; André Mommen | Go to book overview

expansion were postponed to the date of no return, somewhere in the first decade of the new millennium. Amsterdam, none the less, delineated the contours of the future EU and made clear that its shape will scarcely resemble the current one. The introduction of the concept of flexibility was its major achievement. Its adoption made at least clear that, among European leaders, a consensus was emerging on the need to pursue a more differentiated path. A shared recognition of the remoteness of a European federal state, because of the future reality of growing divergences in an extended EU, and the persistent old reality that British and French national preferences are and will remain tempted to limit, rather than to strengthen the powers of supranational arrangements. Under these conditions, regional integration in Europe will be a mixture of greater coordination of domestic policies and new associationism regarding external policies. Forced by external circumstances and the internal policy to maintain the Franco-German equilibrium, the EU will need to open its markets and expand its borders through the creation of free trade areas involving its peripheries in the South and the East.

BIBLIOGRAPHY


b
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c
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d
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e
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h
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i
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k
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-170-

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