Santayana: the Later Years: A Portrait with Letters

By Daniel Cory | Go to book overview

Eleven: 1939

...if there is a war, I could keep my thoughts on distant things by writing my recollections, I mean Persons and Places.

I HAD been distressed to learn that T. S. Eliot had decided to discontinue the publication of the Criterion, and an interesting letter from Santayana on January 5 revolved in this same orbit of reflection:

Yesterday evening I had a visit from -- Ezra Poundl! He is taller, younger, better-looking than I expected. Reminded me of several old friends (young, when I knew them) who were spasmodic rebels, but decent by tradition, emulators of Thoreau, full of scraps of culture but lost, lost, lost in the intellectual world. He talked rather little (my fault and that of my deaf ear, that makes me not like listening when I am not sure what has been said), and he made no breaks, such as he indulges in in print. Was he afraid of me? How odd! such a dare-devil as he poses as! I had just been reading his article, and the one about him, in the Criterion, so that I felt no chasm between us -- "us" being my sensation of myself and my idea of him.

We mentioned Rimbaud, and he immediately (was it telepathy?) said. "L'Auberge Verte! He never got to anything better than that."

His beard is like a painter's and his head of hair (is it a wig?) like a musician's. On the whole, we got on very well, but nothing was said except commonplace.

Do you know anything about the real reason why the

-206-

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Santayana: the Later Years: A Portrait with Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Prologue 11
  • One: 1927-28 15
  • Two: 1929 37
  • Three: 1930-31 59
  • Four: 1932 89
  • Five: 1933 106
  • Six: 1934 122
  • Seven: 1935 146
  • Eight: 1936 165
  • Nine: 1937 181
  • Ten: 1938 193
  • Eleven: 1939 206
  • Twelve: 1940-41 225
  • Thirteen: 1942-46 245
  • Fourteen: 1947-48 266
  • Fifteen: 1949-50 290
  • Sixteen: 1951-52 306
  • Epilogue 328
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