Mind, Method, and Conditionals: Selected Essays

By Frank Jackson | Go to book overview

15

GRUE

This chapter is concerned with an aspect of the problem of describing or specifying those inductive practices we take to be rational.

At the level of description, there is no doubt that one common inductive practice we take to be rational is to project common properties from samples to populations, to argue from certain Fs being G to certain other Fs being G. There are many ways we can try to spell out this practice in semi-formal terms: by saying ‘Fa & Ga’ confirms (x)(Fx⊃Gx)’, or ‘All examined As are B’ supports ‘All unexamined As are B, or ‘Fa1 && Fan’ gives a good reason for ‘Fan+1’, and so on. The precise way chosen will not particularly concern us, and I will simply refer to the kind of inductive argument pattern reflected in the various formalisations as the straight rule (SR). The discussion will be restricted to the simplest case where everything in a sample, not merely a percentage, has the property we are concerned with.

To say that the SR is one common inductive argument pattern we all acknowledge as rational is not to say that it is the most fundamental inductive argument pattern, or the most important in science, or the pattern that must be justified if induction is to be justified; it is simply to say what is undeniable—that we all use it on occasion and take it as rational to do so. This chapter is not concerned with how important or fundamental the SR is—for example, vis-à-vis hypothetico-deduction—it is concerned with the description of those applications of the SR which we regard as rational.

Since Nelson Goodman’s 1946 paper and the development of it in Fact, Fiction, and Forecast,1 it has been very widely supposed that the rough description of the SR given above—as certain Fs

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mind, Method, and Conditionals: Selected Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part I - Conditionals 1
  • 1 - On Assertion and Indicative Conditionals 3
  • 2 - Classifying Conditionals I 27
  • 3 - Classifying Conditionals II 43
  • 4 - Postscript on Truth Conditions and Assertability 51
  • Part II - Mind 55
  • 5 - Epiphenomenal Qualia 57
  • 6 - What Mary Didn’t Know 70
  • 7 - Postscript on Qualia 76
  • 8 - Mental Causation I 80
  • 9 - Mental Causation Without the Language of Thought 113
  • Part III - Method in Metaphysics 131
  • 10 - Metaphysics by Possible Cases 133
  • 11 - Armchair Metaphysics 154
  • Part IV - Ethics and Action Theory 177
  • 12 - Weakness of Will 179
  • Notes 196
  • 13 - On the Semantics and Logic of Obligation 197
  • 14 - Decision-Theoretic Consequentialism and the Nearest and Dearest Objection 220
  • Part V - Induction 247
  • 15 - Grue 249
  • Bibliography 270
  • Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.