African Identities: Race, Nation, and Culture in Ethnography, Pan-Africanism, and Black Literatures

By Kadiatu Kanneh | Go to book overview

4

CROSSING BORDERS

Race, sexuality and the body

A dozen shades slid by. There was sooty black, shiny black, taupe, mahogany, bronze, copper, gold, orange, yellow, peach, ivory, pinky white, pastry white. There was yellow hair, brown hair, black hair; straight hair, straightened hair, curly hair, woolly hair. She saw black eyes in white faces, brown eyes in yellow faces, gray eyes in brown faces, blue eyes in tan faces.

(Nella Larsen, Quicksand)

This chapter continues the discussions of time which informed the previous chapter by exploring the roles of postmodernist theories and debates about racial identities and migration. The argument focuses more particularly on British contexts in order to revisit the journeys invoked in the slave narratives and to examine the impact of ‘new’ Caribbean migrations to Britain.

The chapter develops the analyses of Black migrant identities from the previous chapters by exploring how race is figured in representations of the body and sexuality. Each of the preceding chapters has inquired into constructions of race as ethnographic, cultural and nationalist discourses, placing narratives of Black identity within or against conceptions of history and geography that are continually re-visited and re-articulated.

I analyse two texts that return to the territories of Heart of Darkness and A Bend in the River (discussed in Chapter 1), and I attend to the way in which the images and metaphors of colonial narratives are redeployed in African texts. These images of Africa and racial difference, which are exploited in the symbiotic texts of Conrad and Naipaul, reappear in the textual ironies of Tayeb Salih’s Season of Migration to the North and Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy. The migrations figured in these novels from Africa to the West also act as an ironic commentary on the enlightenment narratives of pan-Africanist exiles, which are discussed in Chapter 2, and on their investigative, evangelist journeys ‘back’ to Africa. The playful and more serious interrogations into the links between sexuality and race in these texts are taken up and read through two texts by White authors that, through the novel form and through journalistic autobiography, investigate the meanings of race and sexuality approached by Salih and Aidoo.

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African Identities: Race, Nation, and Culture in Ethnography, Pan-Africanism, and Black Literatures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - The Meaning of Africa 1
  • 2 - ‘coming Home’ 48
  • 3 - Remembered Landscapes 109
  • 4 - Crossing Borders 136
  • Afterword 191
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 200
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.