Europe and England in the Sixteenth Century

By T. A. Morris | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

Comparative Questions
1 Compare the problems that faced the Catholic Monarchs upon their accession in Castile with those that faced Henry VII in England. By what methods and with what comparative success were these problems confronted? (Consult Chapters Seven and Eight.)
2 Compare the methods and success of Thomas Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell in their domestic administration. (Consult Chapters Ten and Eleven.)
3 Compare the foreign aspirations of the kings of France between 1490 and 1530 with those of the kings of England at the same time. (Consult Chapters Eight, Nine and Ten.)
4 In what respects was royal authority greater at the death of Henry VIII than at the death of his father? (Consult Chapters Eight, Ten and Eleven.)
5 Compare the control exercised by Henry VIII over the Church within his realm in 1540 with that exercised at the same time by (a) the King of France, and (b) the King of Castile. (Consult Chapters Seven, Eleven and Twelve.)
6 Compare the governmental systems of Castile and France in the first half of the sixteenth century. (Consult Chapters Seven and Twelve.)
7 Were the wars that Francis I fought in Italy a major factor in weakening the French monarchy? (Consult Chapters Nine and Twelve.)
8 How similar were the motives of the German Protestant princes in the period 1520-40 to those of French Huguenots later in the century? (Consult Chapters Four, Thirteen and Fifteen.)
9 Compare the impact of Calvinism in France and in the British Isles. (Consult Chapters Five, Fifteen, Eighteen and Nineteen.)
10 Why did Charles V find it harder to govern Germany in partnership with the nobility than to govern Spain in that way? (Consult Chapters Seven and Thirteen.)
11 Was Elizabeth’s government more stable in the 1560s than the governments of Edward and Mary had been? (Consult Chapters Fourteen, Eighteen and Nineteen.)
12 What similarities were there between the Schmalkaldic League in Germany and the Catholic League in France? (Consult Chapters Thirteen and Fifteen.)
13 In what ways was the religious dissent faced by the French crown in the second half of the sixteenth century more serious than that faced by the English crown at the same time? (Consult Chapters Fifteen, Eighteen and Nineteen.)
14 Compare the problems faced by Philip II in the Netherlands with those faced by his father in Germany. (Consult Chapters Thirteen and Seventeen.)
15 Compare the methods by which Elizabeth of England and Philip of Spain governed their realms. (Consult Chapters Sixteen, Seventeen, Eighteen and Nineteen.)
16 How different were the methods by which various kings of France tried to govern their realm between 1515 and 1610? Why were some more successful than others? (Consult Chapters Twelve, Fifteen and Twenty.)
17 In what respects, if any, was Spain a stronger and more prosperous country in the later sixteenth century as a result of her settlement of the New World? (Consult Chapters Three, Seven and Seventeen.)
18 Did the movement for reform within the Catholic Church have more impact in the New World than in the old? (Consult Chapters Three and Six.)

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