Property and Power in Social Theory: A Study in Intellectual Rivalry

By Dick Pels | Go to book overview

3

MARXISM VS. ANARCHISM

My power am I myself, and through it am I my property.

Max Stirner


RIVALLING REVOLUTIONARIES

In the preceding chapters, I have prepared my ground by offering a synopsis of the historical emergence and consolidation—through a secular process of severance and polarization—of the paired ontological conceptions of property and sovereignty and the master sciences which they animate. I now proceed to analyse their survival, and that of the dialectic of reduction to which they have jointly given rise, in some major debates and traditions in modern social and political thought. For this purpose, the survey chart of modern social and political theory might be redrawn by crossing two dichotomies. The first one distinguishes the tradition of power theory from that of property theory (or the master narrative of politics and domination from that of production and exploitation), while a second, transversal one marks off empirical and explanatory social ‘science’ from normatively committed political ‘ideology’. The resulting fourfold classification repartitions the field of the grand narratives as given in Table 2.

Table 2 The field of the grand narratives

Fact-oriented science

Value-oriented ideology

Property theory

Classical jurisprudence

Utopian socialism

Economic philosophy

and political economy

Marxism

Power theory

Comtean positivism

Anarchism

Political philosopy

Elite theory Weberian sociology

Fascism

-74-

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Property and Power in Social Theory: A Study in Intellectual Rivalry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Liberal Dichotomy and Its Dissolution 18
  • 2 - Inside the Diamond 47
  • 3 - Marxism Vs. Anarchism 74
  • 4 - Fascism and the Primacy of the Political 101
  • 5 - Social Science as Power Theory 126
  • 6 - Power, Property, and Managerialism 164
  • 7 - Intellectual Closure and the New Class 192
  • 8 - Towards a Theory of Intellectual Rivalry 225
  • Notes 260
  • Bibliography 287
  • Index 311
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