Information Technology, Organisations, and People: Transformations in the UK Retail Financial Services Sector

By Jeff Watkins | Go to book overview

9

NEW STRUCTURES FOR TRANSFORMATION

As we have seen, the retail financial services sector in the 1990s is facing a period of intense competition, characterised by rapid changes in markets, technologies, and customer attitudes. There has been considerable discussion amongst managers, consultants and academics as to the most effective kind of organisational structures for companies competing in such an unstable environment. It is argued that the traditional, hierarchical organisational forms, so characteristic of the sector, have significant limitations and will not ensure survival over the next decade. They are criticised for being too slow to respond to a fast-changing business environment, for poor lateral communications, and for their functionally-based emphasis with large numbers of relatively unskilled staff working on fairly simple routine tasks.

In current market conditions, organisations need structures which facilitate the creation, communication, and flow of new ideas, allowing greater emphasis to be given to innovation, flexibility, and quick response to change. Different kinds of human resource strategies are needed to help those who work in them and those who manage them to adapt to new roles. In ‘a learning organisation: an organisation which learns and which wants its people to learn’ (Handy, 1989), the adaptation is seen as a two-way learning process in which managers and staff learn from one another and make mutual adjustments.

This chapter is in two sections. Section 1 outlines the key features of the flexible organisation, and the learning organisation—two popular themes of the early 1990s. Section 2 considers the development of new organisational structures, roles, and the human resource strategies required to manage change.


Section 1

The flexible organisation

All organisations, including the traditional hierarchy, are built on networks of relationships, some formal with long-term, regularised exchanges between

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Information Technology, Organisations, and People: Transformations in the UK Retail Financial Services Sector
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.