The Great Immigration: Russian Jews in Israel

By Dina Siegel | Go to book overview

3. THE CREATION OF A ' PUBLIC PROBLEM'

T he Great Immigration as a historic and public event did not become part of everyday life of individual Israelis, who in general have only little involvement in and knowledge of individual cases of new immigrants. The facts as presented by those who have more information on and connection to the Russian Jewish immigrants (officials, journalists, social workers and others) have created the 'public reality'. These facts do not convey information about specific issues, but rather about the 'general situation' of immigration. In this sense we are reminded of Durkheim's concept of 'social facts' -- the results of the 'collective consciousness' and not of individual events ( Durkheim 1951: 46-53). As a result, a general image of the group of Russian Jewish immigrants is created and used by representatives of various governmental and public agencies, which claim to be professionals, to have a mandate and to use terms and concepts in which the 'reality' is shaped. This is their strategy to wield power.

Defining reality in calculated way is a part of the process of wielding power. It also includes the delegitimation of alternative facts, the implementation of policies based on 'official' facts, and blaming the objects of these policies for any failure. Thus, if the state cannot deal with new immigrants, then they are a 'social problem'.

Social problems never appear by themselves and are certainly not created without specific purposes. In order to recognise a situation as problematic, players in a specific social situation must be defined. Every social problem has a long history and cannot be interpreted in the same

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great Immigration: Russian Jews in Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1- Russian Jewish Immigration to Israel In Its Historical Perspective 1
  • 2- the Russian Jewish Community -- Myth And Reality 23
  • 3- the Creation Of a ' Public Problem' 73
  • 4- the Relationship With Other Ethnic Groups 116
  • 5 - Political Absorption 143
  • 6. Conclusions 189
  • Epilogue 195
  • Appendices 197
  • Glossary 205
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.