Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996

By Richard J. Evans | Go to book overview

6

POLICE AND SOCIETY FROM ABSOLUTISM TO DICTATORSHIP 1

I

‘The German policeman’, complained the English humorist Jerome K. Jerome in 1900, ‘does not understand a joke.’ Perhaps, he went on, this was just as well, ‘for I believe there is a heavy fine for joking with any German uniform; they call it “treating an official with contumely”’. Like many other foreign visitors to Germany both before and since, Jerome was struck by the omnipresence and omnipotence of the German police. ‘To any young Englishman yearning to get himself into a scrape, and finding himself hampered in his own country’, Jerome continued ironically, ‘I would advise a single ticket to Germany… In the Police Guide of the Fatherland he will find set forth a list of the things the doing of which will bring to him interest and excitement.’ Unlike in Britain, the police in Germany had independent powers of fining and punishing misdemeanours, and used them according to a fixed scale published in advance. Thus, Jerome advised his readers,

You know exactly what your fun is going to cost you, You can spread out your money on the table, open your Police Guide, and plan out your holiday to a fifty pfennig piece. For a really cheap evening, I would recommend walking on the wrong side of the pavement after being cautioned not to do so. I calculate that by choosing your district and keeping to the quiet side-streets you could walk for a whole evening on the wrong side of the pavement at a cost of little over three marks. 2

Other foreign visitors agreed. The American Ray Stannard Baker, visiting Germany the next year, found the constant police presence on the streets suffocating. 3 His compatriot the social investigator Raymond B. Fosdick, writing in 1914, was struck by ‘the army of Verboten signs’ and the fact that ‘on every side and at every turn, the German citizen is confronted by newly adopted police regulations’. 4

Anglo-American observers of the German scene were not wholly mistaken when they noticed major differences between the traditions of

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.