Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996

By Richard J. Evans | Go to book overview

Part IV

FACES OF THE THIRD REICH

Part IV turns to biography. The individuals discussed here were not major ideologues of the Nazi regime; all were detached from it in one way or another; the last two, indeed, Claus von Stauffenberg and Winston Churchill, became its mortal enemies. Chapter 14 takes a close look at the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, whose conduct in staying in Germany for the duration of the Third Reich has aroused fierce controversy over the years. Steering a careful course between Furtwängler’s partisans, who refuse to believe that a great musician could not be a great man, and his critics, who refuse to believe that anyone who occupied as prominent a position in the cultural life of Nazi Germany as he did could not be an out-and-out Nazi himself, the chapter argues that Furtwängler is best understood as a man whose political conservatism and German nationalism caused him to have deeply ambivalent though by no means wholly hostile feelings towards the regime. When it originally appeared in The Times Literary Supplement in 1992, the review article was violently attacked by Furtwängler fans, while the letters and articles published in its support by critics of the conductor such as Bernard Levin did it little service either by going much further than I had done in condemning his conduct. Steering a middle course in a debate that had become totally polarized over the years proved, in other words, to be no easy task.

Equally fierce controversy was aroused by Chapter 15 when it originally appeared in the same journal a few weeks before the article on Furtwängler. Here the debate was polarized between those who, like Britain’s wartime government and many since, just dismiss the Bomb Plot of 20 July 1944 as an outbreak of internecine warfare within the Nazi regime at a time when Germany was obviously heading for total defeat, and those who, like the surviving relatives of some of the plotters who wrote objecting to the review, consider that the plotters should simply be celebrated as brave men to be remembered and admired without criticism. In fact, a man such as Claus von Stauffenberg, the soldier who planted the bomb, was far more

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.