Shopfloor Matters: Labor-Management Relations in Twentieth-Century American Manufacturing

By David Fairris | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1
The following section is based on an interview on May 23, 1996 with Joe Buckley, shop chairman of Local 696 at the Dayton GM brake plant.

1 FROM EXIT TO VOICE IN SHOPFLOOR GOVERNANCE
1
It should be noted, though, that factories of over 1,000 workers represented less than 20 percent of the manufacturing labor force at this time (Granoveter 1984:326).
2
The large proportion of inexperienced immigrant labor was a contributing factor cited by the study. Foreign-born workers accounted for roughly half of all less-skilled labor in manufacturing at the turn of the century. Their prevalence in such mass-production industries as steel and meat packing was at least this great (Jacoby 1985:32).
3
The workforce is derived by dividing the total labor hours by 3,000, the number of hours on average that a full-time worker might be expected to work per year.
4
Recent evidence that the average length of job spells during this period was rather high is not inconsistent with high rates of labor turnover (Carter and Savoca 1990; Sundstrom 1988). Very high turnover was restricted to a subset of jobs in the plant—those with particularly onerous conditions, and populated by younger, less-skilled workers.
5
Turnover is defined here as the number of separations relative to the average labor force of each plant (calculated as the average of the minimum and maximum labor force over the period).
6
For skeptical views of the high costs of training less-skilled workers, see Jacoby (1985) and Raff (1988).
7
The Wingfoot Clan (December 25, 1915) is the Goodyear company newspaper, which is housed at the company archives in Akron, Ohio.
8
Wingfoot Clan, February 18, 1918.
9
Ibid. March 6, 1918.
10
The data appendix contains the precise definitions and the source for these variables. The ten industries for which data could be constructed were autos, clothing, food products, iron and steel, printing and publishing, textiles, paper, chemicals, leather, and rubber.

-204-

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Shopfloor Matters: Labor-Management Relations in Twentieth-Century American Manufacturing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - From Exit to Voice in Shopfloor Governance 17
  • 2 - The Amoskeag Plan of Representation 47
  • 3 - The Rise of an Empowered Shopfloor Voice 57
  • 4 - Labor-Management Disputes in Meat Packing, 1936-41 89
  • 5 - Institutionalization and Decline in Workers’ Shopfloor Power 99
  • 6 - Postwar Collective-Bargaining Agreements 139
  • 7 - Contemporary Experiments with New Systems of Shopfloor Governance 146
  • 8 - A Visit to Saturn 168
  • 9 - The Future of Us Shopfloor Governance 175
  • Appendix Tables 191
  • Data Appendix 198
  • Notes 204
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 230
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