ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to acknowledge the considerate help of the following. Randolph Quirk and Deirdre Wilson, of University College London, who eighteen years ago started me and helped me along on the long road of metaphorical discovery. An anonymous reviewer who gave meticulous and penetrating comments and encouraging suggestions when I first submitted draft chapters of the book. Julia Hall, Alison Foyle and Miranda Filbee of Routledge, whose efficiency was behind its smooth and prompt publication, and on whom I inflicted an enormous amount of work in obtaining permissions. Marguerite Nesling, who worked long and hard and meticulously on a text which, given its demands on graphology, must have been maddening for a copy-editor. The National University of Singapore, who allowed me, in those pre-modular days, the leisure to do the bulk of my research and writing. In particular my colleagues at that institution, Desmond Allison, Graeme Cane, Anthea Fraser Gupta and Lionel Wee, as well as David Birch, who gave valuable comments on the penultimate drafts. My outstanding students Dorothy Koh and Ramona Tang and other students in the EL412 Honours Class, who provided essential feedback. My parents, Edgar and Eileen, who always encouraged and supported me in my academic pursuits. And my immediate family, Mathanee, Julia and Thomas, whose understanding and forbearance (all those late bedtimes, lost games of Monopoly and badminton!) made this book possible.

The author and publishers would like to thank the copyright holders for permission to reproduce extracts from the following:

‘In a station of the Metro’, from Collected Shorter Poems by Ezra Pound; ‘An advancement of learning’ and ‘Death of a naturalist’, from Death of a Naturalist by Seamus Heaney; ‘The love song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ and ‘Burnt Norton’, from Collected Poems 1909-1962 by T.S. Eliot; ‘The unknown citizen’, from Collected Poems by W.H. Auden, edited by Edward Mendelson; ‘Wind’, from The Hawk in the Rain by Ted Hughes; Darkness Visible, Free Fall, Lord of the Flies, Pincher Martin, The Inheritors and The Spire all by William Golding: by permission of Faber and Faber Ltd;

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Language of Metaphors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Tables x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Metaphorical and Literal Language 14
  • 2 - Metaphor and the Dictionary 41
  • 3 - Metaphor and the Dictionary 82
  • 4 - How Different Kinds of Metaphors Work 107
  • 5 - Relevance Theory and the Functions of Metaphor 137
  • 6 - The Signalling of Metaphor 168
  • 7 - The Specification of Topics 198
  • 8 - The Specification of Grounds 229
  • 9 - The Interplay of Metaphors 255
  • 10 - Metaphor in Its Social Context 283
  • Notes 329
  • References 335
  • Texts Used for Examples and Analysis (and Abbreviations Used in References) 342
  • Index 347
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.