Postnationalist Ireland: Politics, Culture, Philosophy

By Richard Kearney | Go to book overview

10

John Toland

An Irish Philosopher?

John Toland was condemned by the Irish parliament and denounced from church pulpits all over Ireland after the publication in 1696 of his controversial book, Christianity not Mysterious. Threatened with arrest, Toland fled abroad (not for the first time). Then only 26, he was to spend the remainder of his years in exile, philosophizing, publishing and polemicizing on the burning issues of his time. On his death-bed in 1722, Toland signed one of his last books, Pantheisticon, with what he claimed was his original baptismal name Janus Junius Edganesius—a signature indicating his place of birth on the Inis Eoghain peninsula in Donegal in accordance with native Gaelic practice. Beside this baptismal name, he added the pseudonym Cosmopoli, meaning ‘one who belongs to the world’.

But who was John Toland? Those who have tried to answer this question have generally given up in despair. Pierre des Maizeaux, who embarked on a biography shortly after Toland’s death, found the materials insufficient. The intervening two-and-a-half centuries have not improved matters, as Robert Sullivan admits in his recent mammoth study of the man: ‘Toland habitually covered his tracks, and the bulk of his papers have been destroyed. Coming across the order “burn this” on the charred fragment of a letter concerning Toland, a researcher must wonder how much [else] has been lost besides’. 1 Toland himself proposes some solution to this anticipated dilemma—‘If you would know more of him (he writes of himself) search his writings’ (caetera scriptis pete).2 But this, as we shall see, is no solution. Toland’s final self-description, inscribed in a Latin epitaph on his grave in a Putney churchyard, declared that he would rise again, ‘yet never to [be] the same Toland more’ (At idemfuturus Tolandus nunquarri). But who, one is compelled to ask, is the same Toland? Which Toland are we talking about? Even in death, John Toland continued to tease and mystify. 3 He chose to remain an enigma.

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Postnationalist Ireland: Politics, Culture, Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Politics 13
  • 1 - Beyond Sovereignty 15
  • 2 - Ideas of a Republic 25
  • 3 - Genealogy of the Republic 39
  • 4 - Postnationalism and Postmodernity 57
  • 5 - Rethinking Ireland 70
  • Part II - Culture 97
  • 6 - The Fifth Province 99
  • 7 - Myths of Motherland 108
  • 8 - Myth and Nation in Modern Irish Poetry 122
  • Part III - Philosophy 143
  • 9 - George Berkeley 145
  • 10 - John Toland 157
  • 11 - John Tyndall and Irish Science 169
  • Postscript 178
  • Notes 189
  • Index 248
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.