Towards a 'Natural' Narratology

By Monika Fludernik | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE IN THE WILDERNESS
1
See the debate between Searle and Derrida (Derrida 1977a, 1977b; Searle 1977).
2
Compare Fludernik (1993a: Chapter 8).
3
Greenblatt’s pattern mirrors other famous journeys into the wilderness’ heart of darkness which are characterized by an intensification of linguistic recuperation but are eventually confronted with speechless horror, or the very horror of inarticulation. The heart of darkness is the site at which language is maximally deployed but fails to signify, provoking speechless terror.
4
Compare the dictum: ‘Realism, whose only definition is that it intends to avoid the question of reality’ (Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition; quoted Kearns 1992:857).
5
In the original: ‘Le simulacre n’est jamais ce qui cache la vérité—c’est la vérité qui cache qu’il n’y en a pas./Le simulacre est vrai (L’Ecctésiaste)’ (Baudrillard 1981:9).

1 TOWARDS A ‘NATURAL’ NARRATOLOGY
1
Constructivism, a sociological methodology, is linked with the name of Alfred Schütz. See, for instance, Schütz (1960) or Schütz and Luckmann (1975). For recent literary applications see also S. Schmidt (1989, 1992) and von Glasersfeld (1989).
2
G. Prince (1995:80). See G. Prince (1982:145-61) for his definition of narrativity as a scalar concept of what makes good narrative. In his Dictionary of Narratology Prince’s definition of narrativity is, however, closer to my own understanding of the term, which appears to be shared by other critics: ‘The set of properties characterizing NARRATIVE and distinguishing it from nonnarrative; the formal and contextual features making a narrative more or less narrative, as it were’ (1987:64; s.v. narrativity).
3
The reference is to professional storytellers recounting traditional tales, but not epic poems (i.e. oral poetry). For Indian equivalents see Tedlock (1983). Traditions of oral folk tales are also widespread in Ghana (Anthony Appiah, personal communication). Materials such as the ones Tedlock presents have been incorporated into literary narrative, as for instance in the work of Leslie Silko. The practice of communal oral storytelling is no doubt fairly general in oral cultures. It is, however, frequently impossible for me to distinguish between the epic genre of oral poetry and the storytelling of the folk tale kind when I do not have very clear information about the linguistic make-up of these orally produced texts. Thus, for languages with which I am not familiar

-379-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Towards a 'Natural' Narratology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Prologue in the Wilderness 1
  • 1 - Towards a ‘natural’ Narratology 12
  • 2 - Natural Narrative and Other Oral Modes 53
  • 3 - From the Oral to the Written 92
  • 4 - The Realist Paradigm 129
  • 5 - Reflectorization and Figuralization 178
  • 6 - Virgin Territories 222
  • 7 - Games with Tellers, Telling and Told 269
  • 8 - Natural Narratology 311
  • In Lieu of an Epilogue 376
  • Notes 379
  • References 407
  • Author Index 443
  • Subject Index 448
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.