Feminism and Contemporary Art: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Laughter

By Jo Anna Isaak | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has been on my mind for many years. Long before I organized “The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Laughter” exhibition, I had explored the connections between women and laughter in the writings of Gertrude Stein. Stein’s mode of writing—transgressive, excessive, and fearlessly humorous—provided a model for looking at current developments in women’s art practice. While there was never enough time to write a book during the summer, there was time to write shorter essays on individual artists. These I wrote with the theme of laughter in mind, knowing that at a later date I would integrate these essays into the book. Earlier versions or portions of individual chapters appeared in Art Journal (Summer 1994); Meaning: Contemporary Art Issues (May 1993); Heresies 26, 1993; Parkett (December 1992); American Imago (Fall 1991); and Nancy Spero: Work Since 1950, 1987. The book may have been on my mind, but it was not really conceived until the spring of 1991 when Lisa Tickner arrived at the college where I teach in upstate New York and managed to pull me out of the deep bureaucratic morass I was in as chair of my department. She looked over the proposal for the book, told me to make a few changes, mail it, and as she put it, “Bob’s your uncle!” This was the first of many important contributions friends were to make to the book.

This is a book of friends. Writing is an isolated activity, but throughout the time it took me to bring this manuscript to completion, I always felt I was working as part of a collective. I am grateful to all the artists who contributed to the book. Our ongoing conversations about art and the friendships formed while working on this project have become part of the fabric of my life. I am particularly grateful to Susan Unterberg who traveled with me on my last trip to Russia to take photographs of artists’ work. I would like to thank the Guerrilla Girls for the cover of the book and Kathy Grove for her work on many of the photographs in the book. Lisa Tickner, Jon Bird, and Avis Lang read the manuscript and made many helpful suggestions. Margaret McKay also read the manuscript and prepared the index, just as she did for my first book and for my PhD

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and Contemporary Art: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Laughter
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Laughter 11
  • 2 - Art History and Its (dis)contents 47
  • 3 - Reflections of Resistance: Women Artists on the Other Side of the Mir 77
  • 4 - Mothers of Invention 139
  • 5 - Mapping the Imaginary 156
  • 6 - Encore 182
  • Notes 226
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 236
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.