Feminism and Contemporary Art: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Laughter

By Jo Anna Isaak | Go to book overview

3

REFLECTIONS OF RESISTANCE: WOMEN ARTISTS ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIR

Reading how woman is constructed as sign in what was, until recently, Soviet society is like entering the Russian futurist play The World-backwards. Like many letters of the Russian alphabet that seem reversed to us, the ways in which “woman” is represented are frequently the mirror inversion of the representation of woman in the West. In looking at the image of women on the other side of this mirror, we have an opportunity (almost as we could with computer image programming) to see how our lot would differ if our image was different.

The project of feminists in Russia today is to initiate an exploration of contemporary representational systems that have determined the social production of sexual difference and gender hierarchy and to raise questions about how women speak and are represented within these systems. To undertake this task of writing and “righting” in the context of the powerful patriarchal syntax of Soviet culture is to initiate a more difficult project than that undertaken in 1968 by the French feminists or by Western feminists in general. Psychoanalytic theory, so instrumental in the development of the theoretical formulations of the women’s movement in the West, has, until recently, been unavailable to Soviet feminist theoreticians. As a result of its suppression, they have been working without an account of the cultural construction of gender. Russian women do not share the forty years of feminist intellectual work that followed upon Simone de Beauvoir’s 1949 statement, “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” Without this intellectual history and without a theory of the construction of subjectivity, discussions of gender take place within the circularity of essentialist, biological paradigms, or collapse into the sexual “in-difference” of totalitarian androgyny.

Even among the intelligentsia and artistic groups in Russia, there is still a strong resistance to shifting the intellectual debate about gender equality away from its deadlock within binary oppositions (men vs. women) and facile formulations. In a recent interview the prominent Russian writer Tatyana Tolstaya claimed that feminism was really a consequence of the

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and Contemporary Art: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Laughter
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Laughter 11
  • 2 - Art History and Its (dis)contents 47
  • 3 - Reflections of Resistance: Women Artists on the Other Side of the Mir 77
  • 4 - Mothers of Invention 139
  • 5 - Mapping the Imaginary 156
  • 6 - Encore 182
  • Notes 226
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 236
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.