Rethinking Domestic Violence: The Social Work and Probation Response

By Audrey Mullender | Go to book overview

Notes

1

THE TERMS OF THE DEBATE
1
There are also refuges not affiliated to Women’s Aid.
2
An earlier wave of action was marked by a Select Committee, established by Parliament to examine all aspects of ‘violence in marriage’ (House of Commons, 1975). This led to some changes in the civil law, following which the issue largely disappeared from view until the late 1980s.
3
The term ‘Black’ is used in a political sense to denote the commonality of experience of all those who suffer racisim because of skin colour. It is acknowledged that there are also many differences between minority ethnic communities and individuals.

2

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?
1
There is clearly a risk of voyeurism and of repeat victimisation in including the experiences of particular women in this chapter. However, the main intended audience for this book, social workers and probation officers, are accustomed to dealing with people’s lives and may not be moved to action by a purely statistical or technical account. Readers are asked to remember the personal distress and resilience that lie behind the facts on these pages and not to slip into the complacency of regarding these simply as ‘case histories’.
2
Dowry was formerly a substitute for inheritance but now passes directly to the new husband’s family and may include continuing expectations of, or dissatisfactions with payment. Indian brides go to live in their husbands’ families and are most at risk during the first few years of marriage and when they are totally economically dependent. Continuing torture and abuse are also reported. Dowry has been illegal in India since 1961 (Heise, 1989, p.5), with the law tightened since (Prasad and Vijayalakshmi, 1988, pp.276-7), but persists there across all caste, religious, class and regional groupings (ibid., p.271). It is not illegal in Britain.

8

THE PROBATION SERVICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
1
Stelman (1993, p.196) has called for both ACOP and the National Association of Probation Officers (NAPO) to express their concern about the primary

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