The Bishop of Broadway: the Life & Work of David Belasco

By Craig Timberlake | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In the preparation of this book I have become deeply indebted to a number of persons in and of the theater, friends and strangers alike, who have contributed of their time, knowledge and experience either out of love for the subject and the era or out of sympathy, and, in some cases, friendship for the author, weltering in a sea of misinformation such as inevitably engulfs a controversial figure in the commercial theater. Among these, to whom I now express my gratitude, I would remember especially:
DORIS RICH and the late RALPH STUART, dear friends, whose achievements in the theater and related fields have long been recognized by sounder heads than mine and whose wide circle of friendship evoked many valuable reminiscences --
VERA MURRAY COVERT, Who made available her vast experience and presided over the evolution of this book with affection and lively interest --
STARK YOUNG, noted author and critic, whose distinguished and unique contribution to the literature of dramatic criticism has been widely heralded --
MRS. THOMAS A. CURRY, SR. and MR. AND MRS. THOMAS A. CURRY, JR., who offered the hospitality of their home and unlimited access to an imposing collection of Belascoana --
WHITFORD KANE, who, as actor and playwright, knew "The Governor" --
MAY DAVENPORT SEYMOUR of the Museum of the City of New York, without whose generous contribution no book on the New York stage can be said to be complete --
CECIL B. DE MILLE, who was kind enough to read and comment on those portions of the manuscript pertaining to his father, his brother and himself --

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bishop of Broadway: the Life & Work of David Belasco
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 491

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.