Strangers Settled Here Amongst Us: Policies, Perceptions, and the Presence of Aliens in Elizabethan England

By Laura Hunt Yungblut | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1
This study will use the terms ‘alien,’ ‘stranger‘ and ’immigrant‘ interchangeably. The designations ‘alien’ and ‘stranger’ were used in the early modern period to refer to foreign-born individuals residing in the realm but with none of the franchises of native Englishmen. These are still used interchangeably in the scholarship on the topic, with ‘immigrant’ being used the most infrequently. A ‘denizen’ was an alien who had been granted limited rights, such as the right to hold and acquire land and to sue all manner of actions in the courts, by royal letters patent. Naturalization, which gave the alien all the rights and privileges of the native-born Englishman, could only be granted by act of Parliament. Aliens could also gain admission to the freedom of individual towns under various conditions, usually including lengthy residence. Further discussion of the statuses indicated by these terms will follow.
2
Although other scholars have pointed out that xenophobia in the preindustrial period was by no means limited to England, England’s reputation for this among contemporaries seems well-established in the documentation, as will be discussed in later chapters.
3
T.H. Lloyd, England and the German Hanse, 1157-1611 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), p. 109.
4
As will be detailed later, as many as 15 per cent of the aliens resident in England were not members of any established religious community. Consequently, there always existed a fairly substantial element for whom the foreign churches played little or no role.

1 ‘STRANGERS SETTLED HERE’
1
A brief list of examples would include documents written by Englishmen expressing this dislike, which are now in collections such as the State Papers Domestic, Elizabeth (hereafter SP) the Repertories of the Court of Aldermen and Letter Books (Corporation of London Record Office; hereafter LRO), and similar collections from the

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Strangers Settled Here Amongst Us: Policies, Perceptions, and the Presence of Aliens in Elizabethan England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vi
  • Maps vii
  • Preface viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - ‘strangers Settled Here’ 9
  • 2 - Dichotomies in English Attitudes Toward the Aliens 36
  • 3 - The Presence of Aliens and Government Policy in the Reign of Elizabeth I 61
  • 4 - Aliens, Policy, and the Elizabethan Economy 95
  • Conclusion 114
  • Appendix A—colchester Contribution Book to the Poor (1582-92) 118
  • Appendix B—norwich Book of Orders for Dutch and Walloon Strangers, 1564-1643 [nro Mf/Ro 31/1] 122
  • Notes 128
  • Bibliography 160
  • Index 173
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