At Play in Belfast: Children's Folklore and Identities in Northern Ireland

By Donna M. Lanclos | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
The acquisition of cultural knowledge that takes place within child's play can be seen in many ways as analogous to the acquisition of language. Both are not simply entire reproductions of what has gone before, but rather a piecing together of disparate parts, encountered by individuals and by groups, within a structure of rules that may also be changed as becomes necessary.
2
The difference between Loyalist and Unionist, and Republican and Nationalist, has been explained in nearly all previous works set in Northern Ireland. It was also explained to me while I was in the field, in terms very like those used in a 1997 article by Gordon McCoy: “Nationalists seek the unification of Ireland. Constitutional Nationalists wish to unite Ireland by peaceful means. Republicans justify, or justified, the unification of Ireland by armed insurrection. Unionists wish Northern Ireland to remain a part of the United Kingdom. Loyalists are Unionists who believe, or believed, that force should be used to maintain the union with Great Britain. Most Nationalists are ethnically Catholic and most Unionists are ethnically Protestant” (135–136).
3
Not having ties to Irish America was especially important in my interactions with some of the adults (mostly parents) at the Protestant schools. Irish Americans have acquired the reputation of being staunch financial supporters of the IRA, and so are distrusted by many who live in Unionist and Loyalist neighborhoods, as well as by some who live in Nationalist neighborhoods but who do not approve of IRA tactics.
4
Diminished intimacy with a community is increasingly an issue given the evershorter periods of time that anthropologists have available for fieldwork, because of funding and other logistical concerns.

-169-

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At Play in Belfast: Children's Folklore and Identities in Northern Ireland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • At Play in Belfast *
  • Introduction 1
  • One - A Day in the Life 21
  • Two - Rudeness and Defining the Line Between Child and Adult 48
  • Three - Masculinity and Femininity on the Playground 84
  • Four - Exploring the Protestant/ Catholic Divide 124
  • Conclusion 149
  • Appendix - Methodology and Description of Schools 159
  • Notes 169
  • References 183
  • Index 201
  • About the Author 209
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