Journeys That Opened Up the World: Women, Student Christian Movements, and Social Justice, 1955-1975

By Sara M. Evans | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Journeys That Opened up the World has been a labor of love for many years. We are especially grateful to the World Student Christian Foundation Board of Trustees for their financial support and administrative and fiscal assistance in the course of this project. Through them we received grants from Campus Ministry Women, the Sister Fund, the United Church Board for Homeland Ministry, Women's Division of the United Methodist Board of Global Ministries, and United Ministries in Higher Education. We also received support from the University of Minnesota Graduate School and the Center for Women's Global Leadership at Rutgers. These made it possible for us to meet in person and by conference call, and to have access to editorial and staff support that made it much easier to bring this project to fruition. Ruth Harris's role as organizer and cheerleader made this happen. The core group—Ruth, elmira Kendricks Nazombe, Jan Griesinger, Charlotte Bunch, and Jill Hultin— has consulted regularly, met several times, and collectively framed our approach to the project. Helen Ewer and Karen Bloomquist, both leaders in Campus Ministry Women in the 1970s, attended the initial consultation that formed the spirit of this project. They played an important role in helping us to recall these stories.

In 1998–99, Katherine Meerse served as a research assistant through a grant from the University of Minnesota. She devoted hours to correspondence and editing, becoming deeply attached to the project in the process. In the final phase of gathering manuscripts and communicating with authors, Jill Hultin generously served as a key node in our communications network. Cheri Register's contribution is imbedded in every chapter. Drawing on her skills as a memoirist, writing teacher, and freelance editor, her editing made each

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Journeys That Opened Up the World: Women, Student Christian Movements, and Social Justice, 1955-1975
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Journeys That Opened Up the World *
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 1 - Ruth Harris 15
  • Chapter 2 - Jeanne Audrey Powers 45
  • Chapter 3 - Rebecca Owen 66
  • Chapter 4 - Elmira Kendricks Nazombe 84
  • Chapter 5 - Jill Foreman 104
  • Chapter 6 - Charlotte Bunch 122
  • Chapter 7 - Tamela Hultman 140
  • Chapter 8 - M. Sheila Mccurdy 157
  • Chapter 9 - Alice Hageman 174
  • Chapter 10 - Jan Griesinger 191
  • Chapter 11 - Eleanor Scott Meyers 208
  • Chapter 12 - Nancy D. Richardson 226
  • Chapter 13 - The Repairer of the Breach (isaiah 58:12) 237
  • Chapter 14 - Renetia Martin 240
  • Chapter 15 - Frances E. Kendall 249
  • Chapter 16 - Margarita Mendoza De Sugiyama 262
  • Notes on Contributors 271
  • Index 275
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