Journeys That Opened Up the World: Women, Student Christian Movements, and Social Justice, 1955-1975

By Sara M. Evans | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
Ruth Harris

On December 27, 1959, more than four thousand college and university students made a pilgrimage to Athens, Ohio, for what was to be one of the most significant ecumenical encounters ever of Christian students in the United States. Busload after busload came from every part of the country, from the eight provinces of Canada, from Puerto Rico, the British West Indies, and Mexico. More than a thousand were international students from all over the world studying in the United States. The Eighteenth Ecumenical Student Conference on Christian World Mission was history engaging and history making. It inspired a generation of students to become active Christians for social change.

I was a member of the international ecumenical team that planned and organized the conference. Our team included Bola Ige, Anglican barrister from Nigeria, and C. I. Itty, a Methodist theological student from India. It was led by Newton Thurber, who had worked as a Presbyterian missionary in Japan for four years. Students from Yale, Princeton, and Union seminaries were also involved in the planning. Our plan was innovative and ambitious. We drew heavily on our experiences with an earlier ground-breaking conference, the 1955 quadrennial of the Student Volunteer Movement (SVM), of which I was also a national staff member. Several important worldwide phenomena had helped shape the SVM quadrennial: The first was “the revolt of the disinherited” that was taking place in many parts of the world against colonialism, racial discrimination, hunger, disease, and illiteracy. Another was the concept of “one world,” the idea that all nations are intimately bound together and that we must see the problems causing social revolution everywhere as our problems. The third phenomenon was the intensified struggle for justice and the urgent need for reconciliation. Yet another was the large number of foreign students coming to the United States to study. Our primary study text for the SVM conference had been Encounter with Revolution by Richard

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Journeys That Opened Up the World: Women, Student Christian Movements, and Social Justice, 1955-1975
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Journeys That Opened Up the World *
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 1 - Ruth Harris 15
  • Chapter 2 - Jeanne Audrey Powers 45
  • Chapter 3 - Rebecca Owen 66
  • Chapter 4 - Elmira Kendricks Nazombe 84
  • Chapter 5 - Jill Foreman 104
  • Chapter 6 - Charlotte Bunch 122
  • Chapter 7 - Tamela Hultman 140
  • Chapter 8 - M. Sheila Mccurdy 157
  • Chapter 9 - Alice Hageman 174
  • Chapter 10 - Jan Griesinger 191
  • Chapter 11 - Eleanor Scott Meyers 208
  • Chapter 12 - Nancy D. Richardson 226
  • Chapter 13 - The Repairer of the Breach (isaiah 58:12) 237
  • Chapter 14 - Renetia Martin 240
  • Chapter 15 - Frances E. Kendall 249
  • Chapter 16 - Margarita Mendoza De Sugiyama 262
  • Notes on Contributors 271
  • Index 275
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