6
Love,
Scandal,
Marriage

I don't think that there is a more honorable, more difficult, more terrific job than having a happy marriage. If you want to be happy on earth, get a good man and love him and make him love you.

—Millicent Fenwick

Millicent's last year in Spain was less enjoyable than her previous years there. That January she began experiencing a constant pang in her side. Diagnosed as a gallbladder problem, she was given morphine to ease the pain. When the pain persisted she received another prescription, but it did not help either. Millicent was in a wretched state. By the winter of 1929, side effects of the medicine caused her hair to start falling out, forming an inverted V-shaped patch of baldness in the middle of her forehead. Because she was believed to be suffering from a gallbladder problem the doctor told Millicent to lie on her right side for a few minutes every morning before getting up. She did as she was told and tried her best to cope with her illness.

When the Hammonds returned to the United States in the fall of 1929 they moved into the Ambassador Hotel in New York City. Their Bernardsville home, closed while they were overseas, was not yet ready for occupants. Within days of their return, Millicent had another gallbladder attack. The next morning a doctor stopped by the hotel to check on her. This time she received a different diagnosis. Her year of suffering was not due to gallbladder attacks but to appendicitis. She was rushed to

-60-

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Millicent Fenwick: Her Way
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Millicent Fenwick *
  • 1 - A Gilded Past 1
  • 2 - Battle Cry 16
  • 3 - A Blended Family 26
  • 4 - Building Character 37
  • 5 - Ambassador's Daughter 45
  • 6 - Love, Scandal, Marriage 60
  • 7 - The Vogue Years 75
  • 8 - Retreating to the Country 99
  • 9 - Outhouse Millie 116
  • 10 - A Geriatric Triumph 134
  • 11 - The Conscience of Congress 147
  • 12 - Pursuing Human Rights 162
  • 13 - Lacey Davenport 184
  • 14 - Seeking the Senate 196
  • 15 - A Little Bit Useful 213
  • 16 - My Way 223
  • Notes 239
  • Selected Bibliography 263
  • Index 271
  • About the Author *
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