12
Pursuing Human Rights

There is no limit to what a man can do Or where he can go If he doesn't mind Who takes the credit.

—Plaque on President Ronald Reagan's desk

Millicent Fenwick could not have better orchestrated her entrance into the congressional club. As she gained national attention, one of her lifelong passions, human rights, was building momentum on an international scale. After nearly three years of negotiations, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe was about to unveil a document—the Helsinki Final Act (HFA)—that would help change the course of the cold war.

On July 30, 1975, world leaders from thirty-three European nations plus the United States and Canada convened in Helsinki, Finland. The origins of this historic meeting dated back to 1954 when the Soviets, in an effort to undermine the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), proposed a conference on European security and cooperation. Initially, the conference was aimed only at European countries and excluded the United States. The idea went nowhere until it was revived more than a decade later, in 1966, and again in 1969 when the Warsaw Pact countries, a loose association of nations dominated by the Soviet Union dur

-162-

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Millicent Fenwick: Her Way
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Millicent Fenwick *
  • 1 - A Gilded Past 1
  • 2 - Battle Cry 16
  • 3 - A Blended Family 26
  • 4 - Building Character 37
  • 5 - Ambassador's Daughter 45
  • 6 - Love, Scandal, Marriage 60
  • 7 - The Vogue Years 75
  • 8 - Retreating to the Country 99
  • 9 - Outhouse Millie 116
  • 10 - A Geriatric Triumph 134
  • 11 - The Conscience of Congress 147
  • 12 - Pursuing Human Rights 162
  • 13 - Lacey Davenport 184
  • 14 - Seeking the Senate 196
  • 15 - A Little Bit Useful 213
  • 16 - My Way 223
  • Notes 239
  • Selected Bibliography 263
  • Index 271
  • About the Author *
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