13
Lacey
Davenport

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

—Robert Frost

Fenwick's long hours and legislative accomplishments were rewarded in 1976 when she defeated Somerset County Freeholder Frank Nero by a two-to-one margin in her first reelection campaign. In her second term, she continued to advocate on behalf of human rights and the full implementation of the HFA. “Either you believe in human rights or you don't,” she said. “How can we have relationships with countries or people who do not understand what we care about most strongly?” 1 As a public figure Fenwick was able to draw attention to the plights of Soviet dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov and Anatoly Shcharansky. She appeared on the Today show in 1977 with Nataly Shcharansky, Anatoly Shcharansky's wife, to seek his release from the Soviet Union where he was a prisoner of conscience. It was nearly a decade before the Soviets permitted him to emigrate to Israel in 1986. All the while, Fenwick never lost hope, nor did she lose track of the many individuals refused their right to the freedom of movement referred to in basket three of the Helsinki Final Act.

The voters loved her and her passion for her job as a public servant. She returned their affection by working even harder. In 1978, Millicent won reelection against Parsippany–Troy Hills Mayor John Fahy, with more than 70 percent of the vote. “She was an absolute workaholic, often spending eighty to ninety hours a week at the office,” said Hollis McLoughlin, her chief of staff. 2 But as much as she savored her work, in

-184-

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Millicent Fenwick: Her Way
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Millicent Fenwick *
  • 1 - A Gilded Past 1
  • 2 - Battle Cry 16
  • 3 - A Blended Family 26
  • 4 - Building Character 37
  • 5 - Ambassador's Daughter 45
  • 6 - Love, Scandal, Marriage 60
  • 7 - The Vogue Years 75
  • 8 - Retreating to the Country 99
  • 9 - Outhouse Millie 116
  • 10 - A Geriatric Triumph 134
  • 11 - The Conscience of Congress 147
  • 12 - Pursuing Human Rights 162
  • 13 - Lacey Davenport 184
  • 14 - Seeking the Senate 196
  • 15 - A Little Bit Useful 213
  • 16 - My Way 223
  • Notes 239
  • Selected Bibliography 263
  • Index 271
  • About the Author *
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