United Nations-Sponsored World Conferences: Focus on Impact and Follow-Up

By Michael G. Schechter | Go to book overview

Appendix B
From PrepCom to follow-up:
Researching the United Nations
conferences of the 1990s
Debbi Schaubman

Even for the experienced researcher, studying the United Nations conferences of the 1990s can seem daunting. The volume of material, the initially arcane citations, the changes in organizational structure, all conspire to make this work appear more difficult than it is. This appendix furnishes the researcher with the necessary tools to begin such a research project. Section I contains a brief description of UN documentation and bibliographic resources in print and in electronic formats. Section II suggests some approaches to conducting UN research, with an emphasis on those strategies most relevant to studying the UN conferences and their follow-up. Section III focuses on finding information from and about non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Section IV introduces strategies for finding secondary source material. Finally, Section V provides a highly selective bibliography divided into several parts: material of general interest is followed by a section on each conference. The last part of the bibliography is devoted to materials on the efforts to coordinate and integrate conference follow-up. 1


I. United Nations documentation

The United Nations is a very prolific publisher. Reports, press releases, background papers, resolutions, decisions, and notes appear in a seemingly neverending stream. Researchers can be overwhelmed by the immense amount of available material. This issue is one that the UN itself has grappled with over the years. Attempts to reduce the bulk of documentation produced have met with mixed success and, indeed, have a mixed outcome for inquirers into UN activ-

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