Power in Transition: The Peaceful Change of International Order

By Charles A. Kupchan; Emanuel Adler et al. | Go to book overview

5
Peaceful power transitions:
The historical cases
Jason Davidson and Mira Sucharov

Introduction

In this chapter, we will illuminate the theoretical framework presented in this volume through an examination of three cases of peaceful power management: the United States and Great Britain (1895–1914), the Concert of Europe (1815–1848), and ASEAN (the Association of South East Asian Nations). While the US–UK case is an example of a power transition in the formal sense, the Concert and ASEAN cases exemplify – to greater or lesser degrees – the dynamics of power management and security accommodation integral to our overall topic of interest.

The American–British transition of the turn of the twentieth century is one of the clearest examples of a power transition in modern history. Following Britain's ascent to power in the wake of Dutch decline, the United States gradually drew closer, increasing the likelihood that war might break out between hegemon and challenger. Contrary to what history might have predicted, the transition was completed peacefully. What explains this puzzle? We will argue that the phenomenon of benignity – specifically, the mutual attribution of benign character – was the strongest factor leading to the peacefulness of the transition. We will also illustrate the lesser degree to which agreement on order and legitimacy contributed to the peaceful nature of the transition.

The Concert of Europe also provides fertile ground on which to test the model presented here, as it is a striking example of cooperation in

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Power in Transition: The Peaceful Change of International Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • 1 - Introduction: Explaining Peaceful Power Transition 1
  • Notes *
  • 2 - Benign States and Peaceful Transition 18
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Negotiating “order” During Power Transitions 34
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Legitimacy, Socialization, and International Change 68
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Peaceful Power Transitions: the Historical Cases 101
  • Notes *
  • 6 - The Change of Change: Peaceful Transitions of Power in the Multilateral Age 138
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Conclusion: the Shifting Nature of Power and Peaceful Systemic Change 159
  • Notes *
  • Contributors 174
  • Index 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.