Toward a Jewish Theology of Liberation: The Challenge of the 21st Century

By Marc H. Ellis | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
The Coming of Constantinian
and Evangelical Judaism

In its most obvious sense, the future of Israel and Palestine is in doubt. The forces against the two-state solution are enormous. To compel a complete Israeli withdrawal from the West Bank and East Jerusalem requires a stronger power than exists. A state of Palestine will be created in the next decades, but it will be a state in name only, its contours limited by a mapping of boundaries that are more or less similar to those proposed by the previous Israeli prime ministers of either party. In this way, the Israeli occupation of East Jerusalem and the West Bank will be redrawn to comport with those boundaries, while at the same time becoming permanent. Israeli control of Jerusalem will likewise become permanent and the settlements will continue to thicken, until the cities and villages of Palestine, surrounded by an ever-expanding Israel, become holding sites for cheap labor and underdevelopment.

On the Palestinian side, the question is no longer nationality or slogans, but survival. On the Israeli side, the question is not about victory, but its costs. On the one hand, victory brings expansion in land and economy to Israel and even a sense of increased security. The enemy defeated and in disarray is certainly preferable to one that is strong and selfassured. Yet, the victory of Israel, like all victories, has other consequences, mostly unforeseen.

The struggle for survival releases a traditional culture from its own mores and from the inhibitions that characterize the majority of any society, thus, the appearance of suicide bombers. The desperation of the situation also allows a slow acceptance of defeat, which may lead to quiescence and a normalization where populations begin to interact and comingle in more natural and ordinary ways. Victory for Israel may,

-227-

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Toward a Jewish Theology of Liberation: The Challenge of the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - A Shattered Witness 15
  • Chapter 2 - The Cost of Empowerment 31
  • Chapter 3 - Memory as Burden and Possibility 51
  • Chapter 4 - A Tradition of Dissent 75
  • Chapter 5 - Toward an Inclusive Liturgy of Destruction 115
  • Chapter 6 - Liberation Struggles and the Jewish Community 145
  • Chapter 7 - From Holocaust to Solidarity 203
  • Epilogue - The Coming of Constantinian and Evangelical Judaism 227
  • Notes 235
  • Index 253
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