Debating the Death Penalty: Should America Have Capital Punishment? The Experts on Both Sides Make Their Best Case

By Hugo Adam Bedau; Paul G. Cassell | Go to book overview

Contributors

Hugo Adam Bedau is professor emeritus of philosophy at Tufts University and the editor of the The Death Penalty in America: Current Controversies. Bedau is one of the leading and most widely recognized opponents of the death penalty.

Stephen B. Bright is director of the Southern Center for Human Rights and teaches courses on the death penalty and criminal law at Harvard and Yale law schools.

Paul G. Cassell is a United States district court judge of Salt Lake City. He is a former clerk for Judge Antonin Scalia (when he was a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals) and for former Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger. Cassell also served as an associate deputy attorney general with the U.S. Justice Department and was professor of law at the University of Utah. He has lectured frequently and been called on often to testify as an expert in the areas of criminal justice reform and the rights of crime victims.

Alex Kozinski is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Joshua K. Marquis is district attorney of Clatsop County in Astoria, Oregon. He has been a prosecutor for more than 17 years and was a

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Debating the Death Penalty: Should America Have Capital Punishment? The Experts on Both Sides Make Their Best Case
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 - Tinkering with Death* 1
  • 2 - An Abolitionist's Survey of the Death Penalty in America Today 15
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Why the Death Penalty is Morally Permissible* 51
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - Close to Death: Reflections on Race and Capital Punishment in America 76
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Truth and Consequences: the Penalty of Death 117
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Why the United States Will Join the Rest of the World in Abandoning Capital Punishment 152
  • Notes *
  • 7 - In Defense of the Death Penalty 183
  • Notes *
  • 8 - I Must Act 218
  • Contributors 235
  • Acknowledgments 237
  • Index 238
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