In Defense of Globalization

By Jagdish Bhagwati | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1
Among the polls, I have been struck by one commissioned by the World Economic Forum and presented at its New York meetings in February 2002. It surveyed an urban sample of one thousand individuals in each of twenty-five countries, and virtually everywhere a majority viewed globalization favorably. But, exactly as I have argued for some time, there was evidence of an ironic reversal: the developing countries showed greater majorities in favor of globalization, whereas the opposite would have been true earlier. Thus while there was much skepticism about globalization in the developing countries in the nearly three decades following the end of the Second World War, and an opposite pro-globalization attitude in the developed countries, this has now turned upside down. I discuss all this later in the book.
2
But let me also say, not to advertise myself but to protect my flank, that I have written about both short-term capital flows and international migration far more extensively elsewhere and propose to write yet more in the future. I have in fact said much that has set off controversy on the question of short-term capital flows, and many of my writings, including a much-cited and translated 1999 article in Foreign Affairs, are reprinted in my last collection of public policy writings, The Wind of the Hundred Days: How Washington Mismanaged Globalization (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001).

As for immigration, I have written extensively on it now for some thirty years, with some recent writings reprinted in my recent collections of public policy essays, A Stream of Windows: Unsettling Reflections on Trade, Immigration and Democracy (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998) and The Wind of the Hundred Days. I also plan to follow the present book with two others on international immigration, one an intellectual, economic, and philosophical analysis of immigration restrictions, and the other a benign look at illegal immigration into the United States.


Chapter 1
1
There is extreme sensitivity on the part of the critics of globalization to being described as “anti-globalizers.” It is fashionable now to assert that the anti-globalizers are not against globalization but are rather for alternatives, but surely that is only the flip side of their attacks on globalization as they interpret it. Then again, it has become fashionable to say, as

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Defense of Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.