The Borderlands of Science: Where Sense Meets Nonsense

By Michael Shermer | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
BLURRY LINES
AND FUZZY SETS

The Boundary Detection
Problem in the Borderlands of
Science

IN LATE SEPTEMBER OF 1999 I went to Stonehenge, the magnificent Druidical stones laid out in the countryside of southern England. Well, sort of. I traveled to Stonehenge…inmy mind…as part of an experiment on a phenomenon called “remote viewing,” the belief that one can, in the words of my remote-viewing instructor—Dr. Wayne Carr of the Western Institute of Remote Viewing in Reno, Nevada—“experience, feel, see, and describe, detailed and accurate information on any event, person, being, place, process or object that has ever existed, does exist, or will exist.” According to Carr:

Historically, remote viewing was developed at Stanford Research Institute for the army and the Defense Intelligence Agency. It was used in a secret espionage program for twenty years. This is why few people had heard of remote viewing untilabout three years ago when the government went public on “Nightline.” Protocols have now been refined to allow trained remote viewers consistent detailed accuracy. Remote viewing could be considered a distant cousin to some other psychic disciplines, with the main difference being the extremely high and consistent accuracy. A single remote viewing usually takes about an hour or more. During this time, one can become “bilocated” and have strong “target” contact with all of one's senses. A target can be in the past, present or future. This is not some kind of “psychic network”; rather it is a serious scientific technique for exploration. 1

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