The Borderlands of Science: Where Sense Meets Nonsense

By Michael Shermer | Go to book overview

2
THEORIES OF
EVERYTHING

Nonsense in the Name of Science

IN 1950, MARTIN GARDNER published an article in the Antioch Review entitled “The Hermit Scientist,” about what we would today call pseudoscientists. 1 It was Gardner's first-ever publication of a skeptical nature, and it launched not only a lifetime of critical analysis of fringe claims, but in 1952 (at the urging of his literary agent John T. Elliott) the article was expanded into a book-length treatment of the subject under the title In the Name of Science, with the descriptive subtitle “An entertaining survey of the high priests and cultists of science, past and present.” Published by Putnam, the book sold so poorly that it was quickly remaindered and lay dormant until 1957, when it was republished by Doverand has come down to us as Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, still in print and arguably the skeptic classic of the past half-century. 2 (Gardner realized his book had made it when he turned on the radio “at 3 a.m. one morning, when I was giving a bottle of milk to my newborn son, and being startled to hear a voice say, ‘Mr. Gardner is a liar.’ It was John Campbell, Jr., editor of Astounding Science Fiction, expressing his anger over the book's chapter on dianetics.”) 3

When we call something a “classic” we mean that it has staying power, relevance that transcends generations—a work that is not just for one age but all ages. Centuries after their composition we listen with fresh ears to Beethoven, Bach, and Mozart; we stand in line for hours to see Leonardo's Mona Lisa smiling across the epochs; and despite universal education and a population of

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Borderlands of Science: Where Sense Meets Nonsense
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.