The Borderlands of Science: Where Sense Meets Nonsense

By Michael Shermer | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael Shermer is the publisher of SKEPTIC magazine, the director of the Skeptics Society, the host of the Skeptics Lecture Series at Caltech, andhe is the author of Denying History (coauthoredwith Alex Grobman, about the Holocaust deniers), How We Believe (on Godandreligion), and Why People Believe Weird Things (on pseudoscience and superstitions), the latter of which was nominatedas one of the top 100 notable books of 1997 by the Los Angeles Times. Dr. Shermer is also the author of Teach Your Child Science, andcoauthored Teach Your Child Math and Mathemagics (with Arthur Benjamin). Dr. Shermer is also the producer and host of the Fox Family television series Exploring the Unknown, and serves as the science correspondent for the NPR affiliate KPCC radio. According to Stephen Jay Gould: “Michael Shermer, as head of one of America's leading skeptic organizations, and as a powerful activist and essayist in the service of this operational form of reason, is an important figure in American public life.”

Dr. Shermer receivedhis B.A. in psychology from Pepperdine University, M.A. in experimental psychology from California State University, Fullerton, andhis Ph.D. in the history of science from Claremont Graduate School. Since his creation of the Skeptics Society, Skeptic magazine, andthe Skeptics Lecture Series at Caltech, he has appearedon such shows as 20/20, Dateline, Good Morning America, Extra!, Charlie Rose, Tom Snyder, Donahue, Oprah, Sally, Leeza, Unsolved Mysteries, andother shows as a skeptic of weird and extra ordinary claims.

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