In Defense of Global Capitalism

By Johan Norberg | Go to book overview
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Defense of Global Capitalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Preface 7
  • I - Every Day in Every Way … 19
  • The Half Truth 20
  • Poverty Reduction 25
  • Hunger 31
  • Education 36
  • Democratization 38
  • Oppression of Women 43
  • China 47
  • India 51
  • Global Inequality 54
  • Reservations 60
  • II - … and It's No Coincidence! 63
  • That's Capitalism for You! 64
  • Growth—a Blessing 72
  • Freedom or Equality? Why Choose? 84
  • Property Rights—for the Sake of the Poor 90
  • The East Asian “miracle” 99
  • The African Morass 104
  • III - Free Trade is Fair Trade 113
  • Mutual Benefit 114
  • Important Imports 120
  • Free Trade Brings Growth 128
  • No End of Work 136
  • Freedom of Movement—for People as Well 145
  • IV - The Development of the Developing Countries 151
  • An Unequal Distribution—of Capitalism 152
  • The White Man's Shame 156
  • The Case of Latin America 163
  • On the Trade Route 169
  • Let Them Keep Their Tariffs 173
  • The Debt Trap 177
  • The Right Medicine 186
  • V - Race to the Top 191
  • I'm All for Free Trade, But… 192
  • Child Labor 198
  • But What About Us? 203
  • Big is Beautiful 210
  • Gold and Green Forests 224
  • VI - Irrational, International Capital? 239
  • The Leaderless Collective 240
  • Regulate More? 249
  • Tobin Tax 253
  • The Asian Crisis 259
  • Instead of Crisis 264
  • The Dictatorship of the Market? 268
  • VII - Liberalize, Don't Standardize 277
  • The Right of Choose a Culture 278
  • The Onward March of Freedom 286
  • Notes 293
  • Index 307
  • About the Author *
  • Cato Institute *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.