Copy Fights: The Future of Intellectual Property in the Information Age

By Adam Thierer; Wayne Crews | Go to book overview

2
Defending Intellectual Property
James V. DeLong

Food Fights

Intellectual property (IP) is a fine topic for anyone with a bent for mischief. Because the views of the libertarian-leaning community are both fractured and vehement, at any Cato or Competitive Enterprise Institute gathering one can idly ask, “So, what do you think of Napster?” and sit back to enjoy the entertainment. This is special fun at lunch meetings, as anyone with fond memories of the food fight in Animal House will quickly understand. If you have forgotten that scene, you can rent the movie for about $3.00, thanks to a system of protecting intellectual property that enables video rental outlets to maintain large stocks of old classics.

Despite the virtues of protecting IP, as demonstrated by such pragmatic criteria as the easy availability of old movies, not everyone likes the institution. One camp of skeptics contains libertarian-oriented critics who accept the institution of tangible property as both morally compelled and socially vital but do not believe that intellectual property is supported by the same philosophical and practical considerations. They would not allow a creator to invoke the legal power of the state to exclude others from using his creation. 1 However, they would allow self-help, ranging from encryption to contract. Their objection is not so much to the idea of intellectual property as it is to the use of state power to enforce it.

Another camp might be called the anarchists. Their view seems to be that the intellectual property should be available to all, in no way subject to the control of the creator. 2 I have yet to read of anyone propounding the proposition that a creator has an affirmative duty to create and may not withhold his effort just because he has no mechanism for obtaining recompense for the effort, but I would not be surprised to see such an argument. 3

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Copy Fights: The Future of Intellectual Property in the Information Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.