ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE FIRST two chapters of this book were originally delivered as Tanner Lectures at Princeton University on November 13 and 15, 1991. I had been a graduate student at Princeton, and the lectures were dedicated, as is this book, to my teachers there. Chapters 1 and 2 are reprinted with the permission of the University of Utah Press from the Tanner Lectures on Human Values, vol. 14 (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, © 1992). (Some additions and changes have been made in the versions printed here.) First drafts of these two chapters were written at the Rockefeller Foundation Research Center at Bellagio, Italy, in the summer of 1989.

Portions of Chapter 5 constituted the Walter C. Schnackenberg Memorial Lecture, given at Pacific Lutheran University in March 1990. Parts of Chapters 5–5 were given as a Centennial Lecture at the University of Chicago in May 1992.

I am grateful to the discussants of the lectures at Princeton—Gilbert Harman (who also read the complete manuscript), Clifford Geertz, Susan Hurley, and Amos Tversky—and also to Scott Brewer, Eugene Goodheart, David Gordon, Christine Korsgaard, Elijah Millgram, Bill Puka, Tim Scanlon, Howard Sobel, and William Talbott for their very helpful comments and suggestions. Special thanks go to Amartya Sen for many stimulating discussions of this material, inside classes we have taught together and out.

I am very grateful to Laurance Rockefeller for his interest in and generous support of this research project.

I thank my wife, Gjertrud Schnackenberg, who made the years during which this book was written so romantic and loving—and such fun.

-ix-

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The Nature of Rationality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • The Nature of Rationality *
  • I - How to Do Things with Principles 3
  • II - Decision-Value 41
  • III - Rational Belief 64
  • IV - Evolutionary Reasons 107
  • V - Instrumental Rationality and Its Limits 133
  • Notes 183
  • Subject Index 219
  • Index of Names 224
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