The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3

By Philip H. Burch Jr. | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

This work was begun in the early 1960s in an effort to explore some of the linkages between business and government as revealed by an examination of the makeup of the boards of directors of America's large corporations. This, I later discovered, was an approach which had not yet been employed in a thorough, systematic fashion, primarily because the requisite business directories were not available over a long period of time to be mined by various able historians and other social scientists. In part because of my orientation and training as a political scientist, my initial labors were confined to the post-1941 period, and focused largely on the federal recruitment process. However, as my work continued, the question naturally arose, what was the politico-economic linkage pattern in the preceding period? So I carried this general line of analysis back to the turn of the century, for most of which period a number of good business directories were available (along with a substantial set of secondary works); then to the late 1860s, for which years only Poor's Railroad Manual was available (to be supplemented by a wide variety of secondary sources); and finally, in one last major research effort, back through the pre-Civil War decades to 1789, for which years I had to rely largely on non-primary material, particularly biographical studies of high federal officials.

The initial aim of this study was to make a systematic analysis of the socio‐ economic background of the top appointive officials in the federal government over time in the hope that the data might be put to good use by other social scientists. Another equally important purpose was to employ these recruitment findings to make a rough general assessment of the distribution of power in the country and thereby shed some light on the "elitist" versus "pluralist" controversy which has been raging among political scientists and sociologists in recent decades. The analysis of major issues and events was undertaken somewhat later in an effort to show that there may be a significant relationship between the background of various high federal officials and their governmental actions, although it should be stressed that the latter acts do not constitute any kind of statistically sound sample, but are simply

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Elites in American History - The New Deal to the Carter Administration *
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The New Deal 13
  • Chapter 3 - The World War II and Truman Years 69
  • Chapter 4 - The Eisenhower Administration 123
  • Chapter 5 - The Kennedy-Johnson Years 169
  • Chapter 6 - The Nixon-Ford Regime 231
  • Chapter 7 - The Carter Administration 307
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 359
  • Appendix A 399
  • Appendix B 519
  • Index 535
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 544

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.