The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3

By Philip H. Burch Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1

Introduction

The relationship between business and government is clearly an extremely important topic, particularly in highly industrialized countries. Yet, as indicated in the introduction to the first volume of this series, it is a subject which, for various reasons, has been badly neglected over the years by both serious researchers and more popular writers. While it is true that certain well-known historians, such as Charles A. Beard and more recently Gabriel Kolko, and some sociologists, notably C. Wright Mills and G. William Domhoff, have done considerable work in this area, they are the exceptions rather than the rule. And their research has been subjected to much criticism, rightly or wrongly, by other scholars in the social sciences, many of whom take strong issue with the elitist or "leftist" findings of such academic revisionists, but who generally do little in-depth analysis themselves, being content largely to accept the prevailing pluralist view of American government. Indeed, despite the impassioned pleas of such eminent scholars as Robert Dahl, most political scientists (who, in truth, know relatively little about the business world) and economists (who usually do not like to deal with the concept of power, particularly as it pertains to politics) have eschewed this important area as outside the scope of their respective disciplines. 1 In fact, as Dahl astutely observed in 1959, a virtual no-man's land has grown up between economics and political science, which, the work of certain conservative "public choice" theorists notwithstanding, has not been filled to this day. 2

What can be done to improve this state of affairs? A look at the literature in the field reveals that a number of scholars in different disciplines have attempted to resolve this problem by dealing with such obviously important concepts as class, power, decision-making, and the distribution of governmental benefits (and burdens) over time. 3 But their efforts have not yet proved very fruitful, in considerable part because of the many knotty problems involved in trying to employ these often elusive terms. Hence the approach taken in this historical study of American politico-economic relations is one which focuses primarily on the role of various influential

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The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Elites in American History - The New Deal to the Carter Administration *
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The New Deal 13
  • Chapter 3 - The World War II and Truman Years 69
  • Chapter 4 - The Eisenhower Administration 123
  • Chapter 5 - The Kennedy-Johnson Years 169
  • Chapter 6 - The Nixon-Ford Regime 231
  • Chapter 7 - The Carter Administration 307
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 359
  • Appendix A 399
  • Appendix B 519
  • Index 535
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