The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3

By Philip H. Burch Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6

The Nixon-Ford Regime

According to some recent studies, the rise of Richard Nixon to the Presidency in 1969 represented a major shift in the distribution of power in the United States, from a system long dominated by the Eastern establishment (a coalition of influential economic and political leaders with impressive ties to both parties, particularly the Republican) to one in which control passed to the more conservative emerging forces of the nation's "Southern Rim." This rim has been defined by the primary exponent of this thesis, Kirkpatrick Sale, to include thirteen Southern and Southwestern states—North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona—plus the lower, more populous parts of California and Nevada. Sale maintained that one of the primary reasons for the emergence of this region as a major force in national affairs was its tremendous economic development in the postwar period, which was centered in six areas— agriculture (particularly "agribusiness"), defense, oil, technology, real estate, and leisure time activities. 1

However, although during the Nixon-Ford years the Southern Rim produced a good deal of the nation's food, did a thriving tourist business, and probably had the sharpest rise in real estate values of any section of the country, its overall economic importance should not be exaggerated For example, most of America's big oil companies were still Northeastern controlled In the realm of defense, only three of the top ten firms in 1970— Lockheed, Litton Industries, and Hughes Aircraft—were purely Southern Rim enterprises. And although three other concerns—General Dynamics, McDonnell-Douglas, and Rockwell International ( or North American Rockwell, as it was known up to 1973)—had major operations in this region, their locus of control lay in Chicago, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh. That the Southern Rim had not achieved true economic supremacy may be further seen in the fact that it still accounted for only about 30 percent of the nation's industrial employment and production by the mid-1970s. The Southern Rim's secondary position among the top non-financial firms is revealed by a look at Table 9.

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The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Elites in American History - The New Deal to the Carter Administration *
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The New Deal 13
  • Chapter 3 - The World War II and Truman Years 69
  • Chapter 4 - The Eisenhower Administration 123
  • Chapter 5 - The Kennedy-Johnson Years 169
  • Chapter 6 - The Nixon-Ford Regime 231
  • Chapter 7 - The Carter Administration 307
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 359
  • Appendix A 399
  • Appendix B 519
  • Index 535
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