The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3

By Philip H. Burch Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7

The Carter Administration

In 1976 there was a marked shift in the political control of the nation when former Georgia Governor James E. (Jimmy) Carter, Jr., was elected President of the United States. But there was comparatively little change in the makeup of America's giant industrial and financial enterprises in the late 1970s. For instance, by 1978 (the latest date for which such figures were available) the only noteworthy development was that ITT had dropped out of the "top 10" industrial category, primarily as a result of the divestitures it had been forced to make in its recent antitrust settlement with the federal government.

Similarly, there was relatively little change in the makeup of the organizations representing the American business community. For example, the NAM remained a body which, judging from its board of directors, was composed mostly of the heads of small or medium-sized concerns and second-tier officials of various large companies, strong evidence that this group was not controlled by big business. The U. S. Chamber of Commerce also continued to reflect primarily the views of small and medium-sized concerns, although perhaps not to the same extent as the NAM, for some of its more important special committees were apparently dominated by major corporate executives.

The CED, on the other hand, remained very much under the influence of big business interests. Unlike most other such groups, however, it continued to include a number of important academic figures among its roughly 200 trustees, such as Derek Bok, the president of Harvard. And the even more elitist (65-man) Business Council, which may well represent the inner core of America's economic establishment, was thoroughly dominated by key corporate interests. This can be seen in the following analysis of the primary

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The New Deal to the Carter Administration - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Elites in American History - The New Deal to the Carter Administration *
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The New Deal 13
  • Chapter 3 - The World War II and Truman Years 69
  • Chapter 4 - The Eisenhower Administration 123
  • Chapter 5 - The Kennedy-Johnson Years 169
  • Chapter 6 - The Nixon-Ford Regime 231
  • Chapter 7 - The Carter Administration 307
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 359
  • Appendix A 399
  • Appendix B 519
  • Index 535
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