Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam

By Bernard Edelman | Go to book overview

Glossary

AFVN: Armed Forces Vietnam Network radio station

AIT: Advanced Individual Training; specialized training taken after Basic Train- ing, also referred to as Advanced Infantry Training

AK-47: Soviet-manufactured combat assault rifle

Ammo dump: a safe location where live or expended ammunition is stored

AO: a unit's area of operations

APC: an armored personnel carrier, a track vehicle used to transport troops or supplies, usually armed with a .50-caliber machine gun

APO: Army Post Office located in San Francisco for overseas mail to Vietnam

Artie/Arty: shorthand term for artillery

ARVN: South Vietnamese Regular Army; officially the Army of the Republic of Vietnam

AWOL: Absent Without Leave; leaving a post or position without permission

BAR: Browning Automatic Rifle; a.30-caliber magazine-fed automatic rifle used by U.S. troops during World War II and Korea

Base camp: also known as the rear area; a resupply base for field units and a location for headquarters units, artillery batteries, and air fields

Basic: Basic Training

Battalion: a military unit composed of a headquarters and two or more compa- nies, batteries, or similar units

Battery: an artillery unit equivalent to a company

B-52: U.S. Air Force high-altitude bomber

B-40 rocket: an enemy antitank weapon

Big Red One: the nickname for the 1st Infantry Division

Body bag: a plastic bag used to transport dead bodies from the field

Boo koo: bastardized French from beaucoup, meaning "much" or "many"

Boom-boom: slang for sex

BOQ: Bachelor Officer Quarters; living quarters for officers

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Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Dear America - Letters Home from Vietnam *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Dear America *
  • 1 - "Cherries"- First Impressions *
  • 2 - "Humping the Boonies" *
  • 3 - Beyond the Body Count *
  • 4 - Base Camp- War at the Rear *
  • 5 - "World of Hurt" *
  • 6 - What Am I Doing Here? *
  • 7 - "We Gotta Get out of This Place" *
  • 8 - Last Letters *
  • Epilogue *
  • Glossary *
  • A Note about the Memorial *
  • Index of Contributors *
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