Emancipation and Equal Rights: Politics and Constitutionalism in the Civil War Era

By Herman Belz | Go to book overview

Preface

THE INTENSE racial and social conflict that racked American society a decade ago caused a curious re-evaluation of slave emancipation and the constitutional decision for equal rights, which a century earlier had laid the foundation for modern advances in the sphere of civil rights. If it was necessary for black Americans to go so far as to engage in virtually revolutionary activity in order to achieve equality, many historians reasoned, then the release from bondage that occurred during the Civil War and the steps toward equality before the law taken during Reconstruction must have been regrettably, nay, tragically insubstantial. I am inclined to disagree with this judgment, not because I think that revolutionary or reformist action —a separate question in any case—was inappropriate in the circumstances that prevailed ten years ago, but because it presents an unhistorical view of past actions and events. By that I mean that it considers them principally in relation to present day concerns rather than in the context of their own time. Without denying the often very direct connection between past events and present tendencies in politics and society, I have tried in this book to present an accurate rendering of the events and ideas that in a political and constitutional sense marked the beginning of modern efforts to achieve racial integration on the basis of civil equality.

I acknowledge with pleasure and gratitude the valuable criticism and advice I have received in preparing this volume from George M. Dennison, trusted constitutional critic and friend, of Colorado State University, and from my colleagues Fred Nicklason, Ira Berlin, and George Callcott of the University of Maryland. The Graduate School of the University of Maryland,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emancipation and Equal Rights: Politics and Constitutionalism in the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 171

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.