Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii: With an Analysis of Justice Dole's Legal Opinions

By Ethel M. Damon | Go to book overview

Chapter II

PUNAHOU 1841-1855

AS INDIGENOUS as a Hawaiian tree, Sanford Ballard Dole had grown, roots thrusting deep into native soil. Like many of his contemporaries a son of the American Protestant Mission, he was, also like them, kama aina (child of the land).

Dedication to the cause and the people they had come to serve bound these Mission workers into one family; to each other they became Brother and Sister, later Father and Mother, their descendants naturally calling each other Cousin. And while this sense of the family bond was strengthened, both parents and children wove their lives into the very texture of Hawaiian life. To Sanford Dole, Hawaii was always to be home, though the tie with New England, whence his parents had come, would always be strong, and on visits there he felt a warmth of welcome and response.

He was born into a century which in the mid-Pacific had already begun to adjust to the impact of Western ways of life. Past was the time of sandalwood shiploads to the Orient; gone were the older high chiefs of Hawaii; gone too, in the first of the fatal epidemics, were many of the people who had built the early heiaus and laid up the first great stone churches. At hand was the era of traders and New England whaling ships to winter at Honolulu or Lahaina; just beginning was the movement among king and chiefs toward representative law-making. During more than a score of years eight companies of American Protestant Mission workers had brought the best they knew of this life and the next to their Polynesian neighbors, to meet of course active opposition on all sides.

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