Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii: With an Analysis of Justice Dole's Legal Opinions

By Ethel M. Damon | Go to book overview

Chapter IV

NEW ENGLAND
1866-1868

MEANWHILE, in his turn, Sanford's thoughts were looking definitely toward New England. This had begun even before George had set out on his pilgrimage. With the younger brother the impulse seemed perhaps more deepseated; more an instinctive longing for the perspective of time and distance, for space to think things out for himself. In some way he had acquired a pair of steers and set to work, plowing and planting, on nineteen acres of upland belonging to Dr. Smith and not far from the ten acres which he had worked the year before for Mr. McBryde at Wahiawa. Even with cane to be ground at the Koloa mill, sugar was a long-range crop, but his hope of possibly a year at Williams College kept his hand steadily at the plow.

He worked too on the plantation as a luna (overseer) or setting up kegs for Mr. Neumann, the cooper. Another venture was keeping bees, the Commercial Advertiser of Honolulu noting that, for neatness and purity, the beeswax sent by Mr. S. B. Dole of Koloa was unsurpassed by the best imported. Queried the editor: "Why may not our domestic trade be supplied by home manufacture entirely?"

The year 1866 ushered in the radical change from sail to steam between California and the Islands. The pioneer ship of the California Steam Navigation Company, eagerly looked for by young Honolulu "Cousins," was reported in their Maile Quarterly on March 27 as the long-expected Ajax, which had at last rounded Diamond Head, and was safely anchored in the

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